Before your operation

Grommet Surgery

Grommet Surgery

On the day: On the morning of your child’s grommets, you will follow the fasting instructions you have been given. Depending on the time of operation, these will either have your child ‘Nil By Mouth’ from midnight, or may allow them sips of clear fluid up to a certain time in the morning. You and your child will present to the hospital area listed in your paperwork for check in – you’ll answer some questions and have some basic health checks. Most hospitals allow children to wear their own pyjamas, but sometimes a gown will be provided. A favourite cuddly toy can usually come along for the ride and as there will be some waiting involved, it’s a good idea to bring an activity, such as a book, iPAD or tablet, for kids to occupy themselves.

Time to go: In elective cases, your child’s support person (usually Mum, Dad or carer) comes along with them to the anaesthetic room, where you’ll meet more of our team. It’s normal for children to be nervous about new experiences – they will look to you for a clue as to how they should be feeling. Kids whose carers keep it cheerful and upbeat (on the surface at least!) are happier going to sleep, and wake up more smoothly… Of course it’s normal for you to be nervous too (shedding some tears after your child goes to sleep is common!) but our caring team will be there to support you and guide you back to the waiting area.

Going to sleep: Small children usually drift off to sleep using a mask. Bigger children occasionally need a small needle to go to sleep safely. To make this comfortable, we use a numbing jelly on the skin before hand.

General anaesthetics are extremely safe. Like all things in life, there are some risks, and you will discuss these with your anaesthetist on the day. In Australia, serious risks exceptionally rare – and comparable to other risky things we do everyday, like driving in a car. Our surgeons have world-class training and expertise – as well as families of our own. Your child’s comfort and safety is our utmost priority. While they are in our hands, we will treat them like our own – right up until we return them to yours.

The Operation: Once your child is asleep and all monitoring equipment is attached, your child will have the ear canals cleaned and the state of the ear will be examined using a microscope. Any features of note will be documented and the integrity of the eardrum – as well as the ideal place to situate the grommet – will be determined. A tiny cut will be made using microscopic instruments, the middle ear will be cleared of secretions. A ventilation tube (grommet) will be carefully placed to hold the edges of this vent open while your child’s middle ear health slowly improves over the coming months.

Afterward: While emerging from their sleep, your child is cared for by our expert recovery nurses. When they are awake enough to ask for you, you’ll be brought to their side so you are available for cuddles and comfort as they wake. Sometimes, children are groggy and confused after an operation – this is normal, and it will pass. Children having grommets inserted do not usually complain of much pain – a little blood-stained discharge is quite common on Day 1, this can simply be wiped away. Children often complain their hearing is ‘too loud’ on the trip home, but they will get used to being ‘back to normal’ very quickly.

Tonsil and Adeniod Surgery

Tonsil and Adeniod Surgery

On the day: On the morning of your child’s adenoid and/or tonsil surgery, you will follow the fasting instructions you have been given. Depending on the time of operation, these will either have your child ‘Nil By Mouth’ from midnight, or may allow them sips of clear fluid up to a certain time in the morning. You and your child will present to the hospital area listed in your paperwork for check in – you’ll answer some questions and have some basic health checks. Most hospitals allow children to wear their own pyjamas, but sometimes a gown will be provided. A favourite cuddly toy can usually come along for the ride and as there will be some waiting involved, it’s a good idea to bring an activity, such as a book, iPAD or tablet, for kids to occupy themselves. If you’re staying overnight, bring spare pyjamas; clothes for leaving, toiletries and your child’s sleep routine items.

Time to go: In elective cases, your child’s support person (usually Mum, Dad or carer) comes along with them to the anaesthetic room, where you’ll meet more of our team. It’s normal for children to be nervous about new experiences – they will look to you for a clue as to how they should be feeling. We know from experience that kids whose carers keep it cheerful and upbeat (on the surface at least!) are happier going to sleep, and wake up more smoothly… Of course it’s normal for you to be nervous too (shedding some tears after your child goes to sleep is the rule, rather than the exception!) but our caring team will be there to support you and guide you back to the waiting area.

Going to sleep: Small children usually drift off to sleep using a mask. Bigger children occasionally need a small needle to go to sleep safely. To make this comfortable, we use a numbing jelly on the skin before hand.

General anaesthetics are extremely safe. Like all things in life, there are some risks, and you will discuss these with your anaesthetist on the day. In Australia, serious risks exceptionally rare – and comparable to other risky things we do everyday, like driving in a car. Our surgeons have world-class training and expertise – as well as families of our own. Your child’s comfort and safety is our utmost priority. While they are in our hands, we will treat them like our own – right up until we return them to yours.

Depending on your child’s needs, you and your Evolve surgeon will have determined in advance which technique will be used. The choice of technique may allow some children to be discharged home later on the day of surgery. Most children will stay overnight, with their carer. A short period of observation in hospital allows us to watch and treat your child should they feel groggy, queasy or experience pain or discomfort, as well as to educate you about what to expect from the days following their surgery.

From simple snoring to true sleep apnoea – with interruption of oxygen blood supply reaching a child’s brain during sleep – diagnosing ‘obstructive SDB’ requires careful history taking to establish not only night-time events, but also the equally important daytime consequences. Your Evolve ENT will likely enquire about behaviour and mood, schooling, attentiveness, and eating behaviours as well as about sleep, snoring, night-time habits such as bed-wetting, sleep walking, sleep talking and night terrors to gain a comprehensive picture of your child’s sleep health, and their management options.

Better Days. Better Nights. Better Lives. 

STRONGER TOGETHER

Beyond expert ENT care, Evolve surgeons ensure you understand your condition, and help you take control of your healthcare journey.

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